lastrealindians:

On Aug 30th 2010 Seattle officer Ian Birk murdered wood-carver John T Williams (Nuu-Chah-Nulth). While the inquest found that the shooting was unjustified Birk remains a free man

We would like to express our thoughts and prayers to the Williams family and loved ones on this day. Strength and love.

~LRI

First harvest of Virginia smoking tobacco. I think we picked it too green, we’ll let the rest of the plants yellow more.

First harvest of Virginia smoking tobacco. I think we picked it too green, we’ll let the rest of the plants yellow more.

(Source: lowtechlowlife)

Henry Berry Lowry (1846 - ?)
Henry Berry Lowry was born in the Hopewell community of Robeson County, North Carolina. Of Lumbee and Tuscarora heritage and one of twelve children, Lowry grew up on a family farm in the swamp country along the Lumbee River. Lowry rose to prominence in Robeson County as a leader of Lumbee resistance to Confederate conscription of labor during the Civil War. Following the war he reorganized his gang and led raids against wealthy conservatives, especially members of the Ku Klux Klan. Though considered a fugitive, Lowry became a hero to many in the area, particularly to native people but also to other people of color and impoverished whites. The North Carolina government declared him an outlaw in 1868, and he was arrested repeatedly but always managed to escape. He also led raids against the Lumberton jail to free captured associates. After authorities took his wife Rhoda hostage to attempt to quell his actions, Lowry raided the homes and threatened the lives of local leaders responsible for taking Lumbee hostages, eventually earning Rhoda’s freedom. In 1872 he vanished.
Sources: Wikipedia, The Columbia Guide to American Indians of the Southeast

Henry Berry Lowry (1846 - ?)

Henry Berry Lowry was born in the Hopewell community of Robeson County, North Carolina. Of Lumbee and Tuscarora heritage and one of twelve children, Lowry grew up on a family farm in the swamp country along the Lumbee River. Lowry rose to prominence in Robeson County as a leader of Lumbee resistance to Confederate conscription of labor during the Civil War. Following the war he reorganized his gang and led raids against wealthy conservatives, especially members of the Ku Klux Klan. Though considered a fugitive, Lowry became a hero to many in the area, particularly to native people but also to other people of color and impoverished whites. The North Carolina government declared him an outlaw in 1868, and he was arrested repeatedly but always managed to escape. He also led raids against the Lumberton jail to free captured associates. After authorities took his wife Rhoda hostage to attempt to quell his actions, Lowry raided the homes and threatened the lives of local leaders responsible for taking Lumbee hostages, eventually earning Rhoda’s freedom. In 1872 he vanished.

Sources: Wikipedia, The Columbia Guide to American Indians of the Southeast

My 12 year old beagle relaxing in between the vegetables.

My 12 year old beagle relaxing in between the vegetables.

(Source: lowtechlowlife)

Hypomyces lactifluorum, Lobster mushroom.

(Source: lowtechlowlife)

(Source: lowtechlowlife)

Longhorn on the trail, Roan Highlands, TN/NC border.

Longhorn on the trail, Roan Highlands, TN/NC border.

(Source: lowtechlowlife)

(Source: lowtechlowlife.tumbr.com)

The Appalachian Trail on Mount Katahdin. 

The Appalachian Trail on Mount Katahdin. 

(Source: lowtechlowlife)

Tableland of Mount Katahdin. August 2008.

Tableland of Mount Katahdin. August 2008.

(Source: lowtechlowlife)

(Source: lowtechlowlife)

(Source: lowtechlowlife)

(Source: lowtechlowlife)

Wild berry pie, made with red huckleberries, trailing and Himalayan blackberries, black caps, thimbleberries, salal, and the last salmonberries of the season.

Wild berry pie, made with red huckleberries, trailing and Himalayan blackberries, black caps, thimbleberries, salal, and the last salmonberries of the season.

(Source: lowtechlowlife)

(Source: lowtechlowlife)